~~~ John's Chicago Style Hot Dog Page ~~~~

(i messed up my original tilde club homepage somehow, vim told me about a swapfile conflict, I restored from the old swapfile, it was missing a few linesand wouldn't display right, until I fix it, enjoy this hotdog page. - John)

If you've never had a Chicago style hot dog you are missing out, my friend. Chicago dogs are like regular hot dogs only in that they are an encased meat in a bun. The rest is a unique, down-to-earth quick meal that is all Chicago. You can get Chicago style dogs anywhere in the country, but the best place to get them is a neighborhood hot dog restaurant in Chicago, naturally. Another great place to eat a Chicago style hot dog is the bleachers at Wrigley Field. Comiskey Park is good too. Chicago dogs are easy to make at home as long as you have the right ingredients. note: navy pier is still under the giant hot dog. Navy Pier is not a traditional Chicago style hot dog ingredient.

What's on a Chicago Style Hot Dog?

  • All beef cased frankfurter
  • Poppy seed bun
  • Yellow mustard
  • Neon green sweet relish
  • Chopped onions
  • Tomato wedge
  • Dill pickle spear
  • Sport pepper
  • Celery salt

What about ketchup?

NO KETCHUP. Chicago style hot dogs are traditionally served without ketchup. The sugar in ketchup throws off the balance, by overpowering the other flavors. If your age has more than one digit in it, don't get a hot dog with ketchup on it. At some places, like the Wiener's Circle on north Clark street, if you ask for ketchup, the cashier taking your order will verbally abuse you. That's kind of their thing over there.

Great places to get a Chicago style Hot Dog

Hot Doug's
For 13 years in Chicago's Avondale neighborhood, Hot Doug's stood as Chicago's most prominent hot dog restaurant, and for good reason. Doug himself manned the register, the fries are cooked in duck fat, and the line was famously long. Hot Doug's introduced Chicago's high-culinary scene to the humble dog with fresh ingredients and innovative, creative dishes that truly expanded the boundaries of what a hot dog could be. Doug Sohn retired from the hot dog biz on October 3, 2014, but Hot Doug's lives on in the memories of encased meats enthusiasts everywhere.
Wiener and Still Champion
Located in the great north wilds of Evanston, Wiener and Still Champion is my neighborhood hot dog stand. Serving up delicious fries that rival Edzo's Burger Shop, the dogs here aren't bad either. Don't listen to the yelpers wearing dumb hats that like to grouse about this place's cleanliness and the owner Gus's surliness, otherwise you'll be missing out on one of Evanston's great lunch spots. See you there on Wiener Wednesday!
Superdawg
Superdawg is an old-school drive-in restaurant located at the corner of Milwaukee and Devon. They don't serve hot dogs but "Superdawgs" which are their own home-made all beef sausages, grilled (char-dogs) and served with a pickled green tomato. They come in a cool box that makes eating in your car a little less messy and a whole lot more stylish. Two large fiberglass mascots, Maurie and Flaurie, loom over the road from the roof. Last time I was there, Matrix directors Andy and Lana Wachowski were directing a scene of their upcoming globe-trotting Netflix series Sense8.
AJ's Burgers and Beef
If you're out in West Lafayette, Indiana, you might think there wouldn't be anywhere to get a Chicago dog. Well you would have been right until 2008, when some enterprising Chicago-area expats opened up AJ's Burgers and Beef, and opened the eyes of the Purdue student body to not only Chicago style hot dogs, but italian beefs and Maxwell St. Polish sausages. The real attraction, though not strictly a Chicago signature, is their garlic cheeseburger with waffle fries. To truly cement their status as the best burger in West Lafayette, Guy Fieri never ate there.
If I've missed your favorite hot dog spot (very likely), send me an E-mail, I'll try to pay a visit and add it to the collection.
HOME